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Why is there not more Loss circulation in IWCF, Wellcap IADC training programs etc?
19 February 2016
As wells become more complex, deplete, and obviously more challenging. (DW, HPHT, ERD, MPD/UBD etc etc)

Plus we know the evident and physical facts and figures that lost circulation and the viscous loss/gain circle brings to drilling and working over wells etc.

and as we search for wellbore strengthening, bridging, stress caging material to prevent vs cure our forecasted problems (where it is from this source that kicks often and evidently result).

With more than 200LCM products on the market and where often only a select few actually work on the applications we need them for.

Why oh why is this subject not dealt with in proportion to the reality we face in competency based assessment programs?

Views, comments, thoughts, facts and figures, success, failure stories, all appreciated. 

regards,

Peter.  
5 answer(s)
AndyPua
Drilling Consultant
PT Drilling Services
Total Posts: 60
Join Date: 15/09/14
The purpose of the IWCF training is to train the crew to be familiar with the theory and equipment related to Well Control. It is already quite a struggle for some Rig crew to understand everything they were taught, due to the level of their education. Now adding Loss Circulation and 200 types of LCM in the course will make situation worse. The 5 days course will be extended to 7 days or 10 days course. And I think the failure rate will be even higher. 
The benefit to the rig crew will be negligible since most of them (Drillers and AD) will depend on the instructions from the Mud Engineer. And in many cases not even involve with it since the Mud Engineer and Pumpman will be mixing it anyway. 
 And like some of the comments above, LCM in certain area is not compatible to another area. Each company has their own policy/procedure in Lost Circulation handling depending on their situation and experience in the area. 
Lost circulation can be an individual topic / training by itself which individual company can send their staff / crew for the training as an option. 
In my opinion. it is a lot of effort with little benefit.
yousaf70
Sr. Advisor, Well Engineering specialist Deepwater, ERD, HPHT & Special Projects
Chevron Corporation
Total Posts: 4
Join Date: 07/11/15
I think that it (lost circulation) was always present as one of different well control topics. May be we need to enlarge the subject but I still think that the actual program is covering this point as well, and don't need to be more detailed. The most important is to focus on human, as he was and still makes more than 80% of kicks causes. 
Other thing, we should to give the real importance of the investment on personal by prepare them correctly before send them to the rig site, by give them the chance to take a large and deep training including down hole problems (which should focus on prevention and not only corrective actions). 
As we know, all of us, our industry is based on the newest technologies coming to the market, and we need to be as possible familiar with to avoid the problems that we live day to day. 
ianpetitt
(retired) Well Fluids Team leader
SPREADAssociates
Total Posts: 37
Join Date: 14/06/06
Peter,

Well bore strengthening is a much more complex subject than basic LCM treatment .
 
To understand well bore strengthening in its required complexity you will need to have access to the 2000 Global Petroleum Research Institute project in to minimisation the loss circulation in synthetic mud.
You also need the buy-in of a wellbore stability focal point. to give advice on well bore stability of shales and how depletion reduces formation strength. You cant rely on conventional drilling engineer or mud engineer  to design the treatment system.  

Most major operators, Statoil Exxon BP Conoco etc.  will have their own procedures on which material is needed - including what size fracture can be seal what types and concentration of material and how these system work.  In Shell we had our own internally approved wellbore strengthening  design guidelines.
 
Most of the major operators are members of a MI R&D joint industry project which has been on the go for the last ten years or so.  Meetings are held twice a year - project work is performed in Houston and Cambridge with rock experiments and many tests using fracture plates simulating rock fractures.
It is not that expensive to join the JIP (£15 to £30K a 
year).   

Regards Ian 


berrouigat
Training specialist - instructor
Nabors Drilling
Total Posts: 7
Join Date: 23/03/14
Well, I think that it (lost circulation) was always present as one of different well control topics. May be we need to enlarge the subject but I still think that the actual program is covering this point as well, and don't need to be more detailed. The most important is to focus on human, as he was and still makes more than 80% of kicks causes.
However, this can be take an important part of the program of level 5 that still the guys work on it.
Other thing, we should to give the real importance of the investment on personal by prepare them correctly before send them to the rig site, by give them the chance to take a large and deep training including down hole problems (which should focus on prevention and not only corrective actions).
As we know, all of us, our industry is based on the newest technologies coming to the market, and we need to be as possible familiar with to avoid the problems that we live day to day.
Slide56
Rig Manager
Dalma Gulf Drilling Company
Total Posts: 1
Join Date: 07/02/16
My guess is that with so many people working globally, to be able to give more than general training in lost circulation would be too time consuming for the program. For instance, the treatment for lost circulation zones we encounter here in Saudi Arabia are vastly different than those in the Rocky Mountains. Here in Saudi Arabia lost circulation can & often does bring a kick into the  mix. Whereas in Western Colorado, that is not the case. Just my opinion. Any other thoughts folks? This could be a fun discussion.
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