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Jetting conductor with welded pads on the side
27 November 2015

We have 36" conductor joints from Dril-Quip with 2 pads welded near the top of the joint.  These pads stick out 6cm from the pipe body.  There are 8 threaded holes, padeyes are bolted to these pads into the threaded holes.

This allows padeyes to be quickly removed during running but leaves these pads sticking out.

Dril-Quip advises that they have not had any problems jetting conductor with these pads sticking out.  Does anyone have experience of jetting with these pads on?  If so did it go OK, were there any problems that might be attributed to the pads?  Thanks for your help folks.

Documents uploaded by user:
Padeye.jpg
15 answer(s)
johnb
Sales Manager
Drillquip
Total Posts: 1
Join Date: 24/04/12

Hi Steve this seems like an older post so maybe you have had enough responses, I would repeat what DQ have advised, I work for DQ, and we haven't see any issues with bolt on pad eyes whilst jetting. There are other non-welded and non pad eye options if you are looking for a slicker OD. 

Your box connectors have (or should have) a handling groove, there are wrap around elevator handling tools which interface with this groove to create a temporary elevator shoulder, then the conductor is run on side door elevators, these wrap around clamps are available as part of the rental package PN 4-201033-02.

There are also 6-5/8” Drill Pipe handling tools for the conductor, also available from rental stock, PN 200377-02


dfishbone
Wellhead Specialist
ConocoPhillips
Total Posts: 1
Join Date: 14/12/15

We have been using these type of pads in Angola, Senegal and the GOM without any issues at all. 

However, we have moved away from padeyes all together and now use the Frank's hydraulic slips and Jet string elevator which will pick up on "slick" OD pipe without the use of elevator rings, horseshoe elevators, etc.  Saves a lot of time in critical path of removing the bolt-on padeyes or even worse the old weld on padeyes that have to be torch cut off.

Augusto
Consultant [retired Shell staff]
SPREADAssociates
Total Posts: 231
Join Date: 02/09/05
There is an alternative which did caught my eye: bolt-on padeyes from XL Systems.
 
In practical terms the welded pads or finns do not hamper the conductor penetration.
scott68
Performance Improvement Coach
SPREADAssociates
Total Posts: 10
Join Date: 03/11/08
Steve,
Sorry just for clarification that should read in excess of 50 strings/wells (not joints) of 36" conductor with boss plates.
Cheers
Scott


scott68
Performance Improvement Coach
SPREADAssociates
Total Posts: 10
Join Date: 03/11/08
Hi Steve,

We have run in excess of 50 of these DQ style welded on boss plates with bolt on padeyes in Malaysia and Philippines. We have had no issues with these causing broaching and nothing special needs to be done with regards to jetting practices as a result of these boss plates. 

Cheers
Scott


eaosborne
Drilling Engineer
Noble Energy, Inc.
Total Posts: 2
Join Date: 01/12/14
I have been involved in jetting several 36" conductors with the pads fixtures on the pipe in the Gulf of Mexico.  We have not seen any problems with these fixtures on the pipe contributing to problems jetting on leaving a path to the sea floor for fluids to travel. 
stevedev
Drilling Consultant
SPREADAssociates
Total Posts: 36
Join Date: 11/02/09

Hi Harald

The DSV offshore was pretty wary of these things and I wanted to see if we could get some field experience feedback.  I can now offer that!

The last time I ran a 36" conductor on O R Olympia (7 joints) it took 12 hours, including gas axing off padeyes.  On this well it took 5.5 hours.  We also didn't have to mobilise extra welders, bottles, cutting gear etc.  So it all seemed to work fine.

The conductor was jetted to depth fine and is now soaking.  I haven't had chance to analyse the jetting record but there does not seem to have been anything to indicate that the remaining pads were in any way an issue.

Harald
Drilling Supt
Amni Int'l PetDevCo
Total Posts: 21
Join Date: 13/09/07
Steve,
You have described in great detail the condition or circumstances, and perhaps you could share with us your concerns of leaving these padeyes in place.
Harald.
OPNZ
Director
Offshore Piling
Total Posts: 8
Join Date: 26/01/15

Hi Steve

The small Cross section of the padeye mounts in question that are presented to the formation is unlikely to have an impact on the overall ability of the pile to reach depth during jetting. Given that the soil in the immediate vicinity of the OD of the casing is not unlike a weak slurry during the jetting / reciprocation process of installation with the soil having been extensively remoulded during this process.

As opposed to driven conductors (pile hammer installation) where the lateral forces around the pile are significantly increased by the driving forces / displacement of soil from under the toe forcing moisture away from the wall of the casing thus requiring a longer period of time for restitution / pore pressure dissipation.  Jetting / removal of soil and adding to the water content of soil surrounding the casing tends to reduce the lateral forces in the vicinity of the pipe  to lower than that of the natural ambient lateral pressure of the surrounding soil, this  allows for relatively rapid restitution /  increases in axial capacity and tends to negate the impact of specific soil displacement (tracking)  attributable to the padeye mounts.

Rgds

Doug
Documents uploaded by user:
Landing Pads.png
stevedev
Drilling Consultant
SPREADAssociates
Total Posts: 36
Join Date: 11/02/09

Thanks Pete.  Nearest offset is dozens of miles away and we don't have an accurate subseabed picture of the sediments.  DQ have said that they haven't had any problems running these, I wanted to see if anyone on SPREAD had actual experience.  I doubt that they would cause us a real problem such as stopping us short of where we want to get to (though if we are at 5.5m and our hard limit is 5m stickup I might change my mind!).

Once the 22" is landed and cemented, communication up the outside shouldn't really be an issue.

Companyrep
Drilling Specialist/Well Engineer/Training Consultant
SPREADAssociates
Total Posts: 339
Join Date: 10/01/05
Steve,


Let look at the physics.


The bigger tool joints on conductor connectors surely present far more downward resistance and exposure and resulting damage to soils that the cross section area of what is exposed from pads CSA remaining?.

So if your end up having problems getting pipe to bottom, or conductors slumping once in a while, connectors, length selected, practices used, is more of causative reason vs small area exposed from what is left of these pads.

Thus are these pad remnants going to affect jetting the conductor much, in this sense, I just cant see how?

What is my concern (thinking about this) is that if the pads stick out more than connectors, they cheese cut the soil and will leave a potential set of migratory path channels for what may lie beneath. In theory clay will close this off as soils restoration results somewhat, how much? We would need to ask a geotechnical expert on this? 

However we have in the passed seen too many bubbles and BOP's covered with hydrates etc  and at times worse because soils ultimately have been caused to be damaged (externally) due to conductor design, practices used, pipe selected and perhaps cheese cutting effects. I'm not 100% sure but these points are worth consideration. 

In summary if your confident clay and soils beneath conductor present no hazard then I can't see the pad remnant being a problem. In some areas that present shallow problems, a less risk solution is often needed i.e. site survey, geotechnical borings, XL pipe.

 


stevedev
Drilling Consultant
SPREADAssociates
Total Posts: 36
Join Date: 11/02/09
Thanks James, do you know anyone in Shell or BP who would have jetted with these welded, threaded pads left on the pipe who may be able to advise if they had any problems?
stevedev
Drilling Consultant
SPREADAssociates
Total Posts: 36
Join Date: 11/02/09
Thanks Paul but the question relates to any problems jetting with the welded pads sticking out.
JDDrouin
QA/QC Subsea Wellhead Specialist
SPREADAssociates
Total Posts: 86
Join Date: 06/05/09
Steve,


I believe that weld-on padeyes have pretty much gone the way of the dinosaurs.  Yes, there are still a few hanging around, but hot work is seriously frowned on around the rig floor, especially when it can be easily replaced by a couple of guys with air-driven impact wrenches.


I can't speak for all the majors, but I know that BP and Shell only utilize bolt-on padeyes.


Dominic
PaulHutton
DSV
SPREADAssociates
Total Posts: 3
Join Date: 07/01/08
Hi Steve 
Past experience with D-Quip  conductor 36" i have always removed the threaded pad eye's prior to running  
if you have 2 x guys with the right sockets and impact guns ready takes about 2 min to take them off 
Regards 
Paul 

 
Posted by

Steve Devereux

Drilling Consultant

SPREADAssociates

Total Posts: 36
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