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Challenging subsea inspections
17 November 2020
Dear members

Of all the subsea inspections, which ones give operators the most headaches?

______

Supplementary questions: 
  1. Do oceanographic sensors along the water column return on investment?
  2. Does monitoring of mooring lines and tether condition benefit significantly?
  3. What decisions do you wish a low-cost ROV could help with? 
5 answer(s)
miaody
Drilling Supt
China National Offshore Oil Corporation
Total Posts: 15
Join Date: 24/09/09
The biggest headaches is if we should to cut the wellhead below the mudline. i want to know is there any guidline about subsea well abandment?  how to deal with the subsea wellhead?
thanks l lot!
MIAO Dianyuan 
Ngajjar
Tech Manager
SPREAD Associates
Total Posts: 3
Join Date: 13/11/20
Thank you Tim and Dave for your responses.

We are working on a US Department of Energy project. It is to serve offshore industry. An offshore group we are focusing on is offshore oil drilling and platforms, in particular subsea operators.

In order to spend taxpayer dollars judiciously, we are asked to use design thinking approach to understand the needs of the industry from domain experts so that the research serves to solve actual problems not just the ones that scientists and engineers find interesting. 
admin
Managing Director (rp-squared.com)
Relentless Pursuit Of Perfection Ltd.
Total Posts: 479
Join Date: 10/01/05
Hi Nehal

It's been a while since I sat in an operator's seat, but I do recall that one type of survey that can be quite frustrating (like the necessity of having to refuel/recharge your car, a necessary evil) is the requirement to survey suspended wells.

These wells are either 'temporary abandoned well' (the hope being we can come back to them, re-enter and integrate into a field development) or closed-in development wells.

From memory this was to be done every two (2) years.

I'm not sure what video evidence and reports are required, and it will vary from country-to-country, but I would imagine being able to do this cheaper would be very appealing.

It would be good if you could share with us the reason(s) you are asking these good questions.

Kind regards

Dave
timclay
Energy-in-Focus
Total Posts: 6
Join Date: 08/11/07
Hi Nehal,

In the last two years I have managed a campaign of subsea gas  well abandonments in the UK Southern North Sea.  Prior to carrying out each abandonment from a jack-up rig, we have conducted well integrity checks and other well re-entry preparatory works from a DSV in order to take some high impact activities off the critical path.

If you aren't familiar with this part of the North Sea, it is characterised by fast tidal currents and poor visibility which impacts the on-bottom time for diving and ROV operations.  The reason why we need divers is that most of the subsea trees were not designed for ROV support when they were installed in the 1980s and 1990s.  Also, you are dealing with pressure control equipment which has been in service for more than 30 years.

The biggest hazard here is diving operations which I would avoid if at all possible, unless you have no choice as above.

Thanks

Tim Clay




       
Ngajjar
Tech Manager
SPREAD Associates
Total Posts: 3
Join Date: 13/11/20
Do oceanographic sensors along the water column return on investment? Does monitoring of mooring lines and tether condition benefit significantly? What decisions you wish a low-cost ROV could help with? 
Posted by

Nehal Gajjar

Tech Manager

SPREAD Associates

Total Posts: 3
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